Ukraine needs to shed its Soviet past and translate the victory of Maidan into real reform and European integration. This must be achieved through dialogue and...

4433 views

"Decommunization" and Academic Discussion

Volodymyr Viatrovych ・ May 2015

The lack of a decommunization policy in Ukraine after its declaration of independence was one of the reasons that led to the revanchist neo-Soviet regime of...

5073 views

As scholars and experts long committed to Ukraine’s regeneration and freedom, we regard these laws with the deepest foreboding. Their content and spirit...

25737 views

Ukraine specialists are quite aware of what some have called the Ukrainophobic ranting of Stephen Cohen. However, this historian who before 2014 never wrote as...

15290 views

Metaphors of Betrayal

Mykola Riabchuk ・ December 2014

With Russia breathing down its neck, the last thing Kyiv needs is for Paris and Berlin and Washington to create a new axis of complacency that uses the...

4023 views

Public Lecture by Timothy Snyder: "Not Even Past: Ukrainian Histories, Russian Politics, European Futures"

Critical Solutions
July 2014

Ukraine is the European present. We have now reached a point where Ukrainian history and European history are very much the same thing, for good or for evil. The European Union is no longer alone in the world. The European Union can no longer delude itself that it has no enemies.

6932 views

Bohdan Ivchenko. The Soviet Authorities’ Policies Toward the Don Cossackdom (1917-1937)

Oleksandr Polianichev ・ March 2014
Kharkiv: Tochka, 2010.
This book, by young Kharkiv historian Bohdan Ivchenko, contributes to a topic in Soviet Studies that has not yet received due attention. The categories of nation and class, by which intellectuals and politicians characterized the population, were of little use with regard to the Don Cossackdom. The author constructs his own narrative, emphasizing the plurality of means through which the Bolsheviks and the Cossacks interacted. At first, the Bolshevik leaders were inclined to think they had the support of the “revolutionary” worker Cossacks, opposing their military elite. However, after
1007 views

On Radosław Sikorski's Othering of Ukraine at Harvard

In Sikorski’s view, Poland and Ukraine demonstrate two diverging trajectories of development after the fall of communism: that of success and of failure respectively. At the beginning of the 1990s the two countries had almost equal starting positions (and Ukraine had an even better one), but then their paths diverged. Sikorski states that the main reason is the behavior of their elites.
Volodymyr SklokinDecember 8, 2014